12 Things to Know Before Taking Your New Puppy Home

Deciding on a new puppy is a huge responsibility. It takes more than just showing them where the food and water bowl is. Think of how nervous you would be if you were taken someplace strange and triple that because you are just a baby.

Your new pet is going to be part of your family, and that means adjustments need to be made on everyone’s part. Here are a few things to know and prepare for before your new pet arrives at your home.

12 Things to Know Before Taking Your New Puppy Home

Prepare your Home

If you have other pets, the process of what to touch and what not to touch has probably long been established. However, with a puppy, everything is new and needs to be explored. Put the shoes in a closet and do not leave pillows and colorful throws where a puppy will be tempted to grab and run.

Getting the Right Cleaning Supplies

Puppies are different from pets that are accustomed to your way of life. They do not understand that mud on carpets is a bad thing or that urinating in a corner is not allowed. It is going to take time and repeated discipline to let them understand what is acceptable.

In the meantime, messes have to be cleaned up and finding the best products to handle the problem should not be an afterthought. Have the necessary cleaning equipment on hand to make clean up easier. You may also start to consider budgeting for pet grooming when your puppy needs a clip or deep bath.

Puppy Toys and Training Treats

old terrier running with a toy

Puppies love to play. However, without teaching them that not everything belongs to them requires having toys that they can call their own. Have these picked out in advance and hopefully, they will take to them as comfort items.

The Right Food on Hand is Important

Familiarity is important in gaining the trust of your new puppy. Find out what type of dog food they are accustomed to and have plenty on hand. Being able to see, feel or taste anything that they are used to will make bonding easier.

Puppy Proofing your Home

Puppies will head toward anything that is interesting to them. A doorbell, a flower in a flower bed or a tire on a moving car will catch their attention. It is up to you as a new pet owner to think ahead and prevent accidents from happening.

Behavioral Rules for the Entire Family

The anticipation of a new family member can be tragic if rules are not followed. For example, the kids greeting a new puppy with playful tactics can give your new pet the idea that there are no rules and that they are free to roam and explore.

Introducing a puppy to unlimited reign will cause disaster in the future. Set your kids down and explain the importance of training a puppy right in order to keep rules in place.

Assigning a Designated Play Area

Deciding ahead of time on where the puppy is allowed to jump, and play is very important. Giving a puppy free reign of the house is a bad mistake. Animals need to have boundaries set and deciding on a plan before your puppy arrives is necessary.

The Trip in the Car

Bergan Car Pet Travel Barrier

Your puppy is going to be very nervous when he gets in your car. It’s easy to jump to conclusions that your puppy does not enjoy their ride if they happen to wet or throw up on the way to his new home. After they become accustomed to your family, they may feel differently about taking a ride.

Stay Calm

You will be just as nervous as your new puppy. However, refrain from raising your voice or trying to give commands. A puppy will feel your apprehension and become confused at your body language and tone of voice.

Keep Introductions for Later

Take things slow and let the puppy become familiar with his new home before letting the other pets meet him. This is a massive change for a baby and throwing too much at him at once will only slow down the process of making him feel comfortable. Wait a day or two they introduce each pet one at a time. They will use their own language to get used to one another.

Schedule Potty Breaks

Since you do not know the needs of your new friend yet, take the initiative to set up a potty schedule. Once every 30 minutes is a good number to start with. After a few days, you will become aware of when he needs to go out.

Let them Sleep

Refrain from letting the kids play with a puppy right away. Your puppy will have a lot to process, which can be very tired. Let them rest as long as they want. There will be plenty of time to play later.

A puppy is not a toy. They are going to be part of your family. Follow these steps and there will be less commotion when he is brought home.